Paroxetine Combined with Early Behavioral Cognitive Therapy on Reducing the Incidence of Stress Disorder in Patients with Traffic Injuries

  • Liu Ying
Keywords: Paroxetine; Early behavioral cognitive therapy; PTSD; Traffic injury; Stress disorder

Abstract

To investigate the effect of paroxetine combined with early behavioral cognitive therapy on reducing the incidence of stress disorder in traffic-injured patients. Before the intervention (after traffic injuries), the overall incidence of PTSD was 32.69% (17/52). One month after the intervention, the incidence of PTSD in the control group according to DSM-IV was 15.38% (4/26). There was no PTSD in the study group. After Fisher's exact test, the difference between the two groups was significant (P<0.05). Before the intervention (after the traffic injury occurred), there was no significant difference in the total scores of the PCL and PTSD self-rating scales and the scores of the factors (P>0.05). After the intervention, the PCL and PTSD self-rating scales of the study group. The total score and flashback factor were significantly different from those before treatment (P<0.05), while the PCL score of the control group was significantly lower than that before treatment. The difference between the two groups was significant (P<0.05). The effective rate of treatment in the study group was 88.46%. The effective rate of the control group was 73.08%, and the difference between the two groups was significant (P<0.05). The incidence of adverse reactions in the study group was 15.38% lower than that of the control group (7.69%), but the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: Paroxetine combined with early behavioral cognitive therapy can prevent the occurrence of stress disorder in traffic-infected patients, and it is worthy of clinical application.

Published
2020-03-01